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Drainage ditches used to dry out parts
of the bog.
 
Sphagnum moss covers various areas
within the bog, creating suitable habitat
for many species, including
the massasauga.
 

With its rich diversity of rare plants and animals, Wainfleet Bog is a fascinating
place to explore.



P
ROTECTED AREAS

The rich diversity of rare plants and animals in many areas of Wainfleet Bog are now protected.

The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources has identified the bog as a provincially significant wetland.

Part of the bog has been identified by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources as a provincially significant Life Science ANSI (Area of Natural or Scientific Interest). These designations reflect the importance of this landscape in Ontario. Significant patches of this rare habitat, or associated buffer areas that link a diversity of habitats, is on private property.

The bog and its species have protection under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, the Planning Act, the Conservation Authorities Act, Statement of Conservation (Federal), and is managed for rehabilitation by the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority Wainfleet Bog Management Plan.

THREATS

In the past few decades, human actions have drastically changed the Wainfleet Bog area. These changes have reduced or fragmented much of the natural habitat.

Commercial interests dug drainage ditches to lower the water table, providing dry access to the bog for peat extraction, local farming, and potential development. Drainage caused the water table to be altered and resulted in a subsequent loss of soil moisture. Wildlife biologists are also concerned about snake deaths from traffic on the area’s highways.

Much of the bog was once privately owned by a peat extraction company. Today, 74 percent of the Wainfleet Bog is publicly owned, thanks to a joint purchase by the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA), the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR). Led by the NPCA, management of the wetland and its species is achieved through these contributing parties and landowners adjacent to the bog.

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